Hotel Original - Turin Egyptian Museum

The Egyptian Museum of Turin offers its visitors finds of great importance and is considered the most important Egyptian Museum in the world after the one in Cairo.

Founded in 1824 by King Carlo Felice of Savoy as "Museum of Egyptian Antiquities" of Turin, it owes its fortune to Bernardino Drovetti who, during the French occupation in Egypt, acquired more than 5,000 finds of great value.
King Carlo Felice later joined the collection of Drovetti with other collections and other antiquities owned by the House of Savoy, thus creating the first Egyptian Museum in the world.

The Museum today exhibits about 6,500 finds from ancient Egypt, but there are 26,000 of those still stored in its warehouses.

The Egyptian Museum of Turin includes statues, jewels, funerary objects and mummies. Among the most important findings:

- the Rock Temple of Ellesija, built by the Pharaoh Thutmose III and donated from Egypt to Italy. After 1965 the Egyptian Museum of Turin saved it from the danger of being submerged by Lake Nasser. The Italian State then donated the Temple to the museum.

- the statues of the goddesses Isis and Sekhmet and that of Ramesses II

- the gold mine Papyrus, the map of the mines of the area in the north-east of Sudan, site of the ancient urban settlement of Berenice Pancrisia

- the intact tomb of Kha and Merit, dating back to the 18th dynasty in which the architect Kha and his wife Merit were buried with funerary equipment and which was found by the Italian Egyptologist Ernesto Schiapparelli

- the reliefs of Djoser, Pharaoh of the III Egyptian dynasty